Nationality, responsibility of states [for injuries to aliens], territorial waters
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Nationality, responsibility of states [for injuries to aliens], territorial waters drafts of conventions prepared in anticipation of the first conference on the codification of international law, The Hague, 1930.

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Published by Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Spine title: Codification of international law.

SeriesResearch in international law / Harvard Law School, The American journal of international law / The American Society of International Law -- v.23. Supplement. Special number, Research in international law, The American journal of international law -- v.23. Supplement. Special number.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14192439M

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Book Reviews non-wealth injuries to aliens, George Yates proves that the doctrine of state responsibility for this type of claim has never seriously been called into doubt. Professor Brownlie's book is the first in a sequence of projected mono-graphs on the international legal system and part one of a comprehensive study of state. However, archipelagic states may designate certain sea lanes through these waters. Territorial sea. Territorial sea, as defined by the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, is a belt of coastal waters extending at most 12 nautical miles ( km; mi) from the baseline (usually the mean low-water mark) of a coastal state. International Law of State Responsibility for Injuries to Aliens (Virginia Legal Studies) [Lillich, Richard B.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. International Law of State Responsibility for Injuries to Aliens (Virginia Legal Studies)Format: Hardcover. The American Journal of International Law (AJIL) is a leading peer-reviewed journal, published quarterly since It features articles, editorials, notes, comments, and book reviews by pre-eminent scholars and practitioners from around the world addressing developments in public and private international law.

Territorial waters, in international law, that area of the sea immediately adjacent to the shores of a state and subject to the territorial jurisdiction of that state. Territorial waters are thus to be distinguished on the one hand from the high seas, which are common to all countries, and on the other from internal or inland waters, such as lakes wholly surrounded by the national territory or. tion and Nationality Act (“INA”) of an undocumented alien’s arrival in United States territorial waters. 8 U.S.C. §§ Specifically, we have been asked whether undocumented aliens who have been interdicted within the United States’s territorial waters are entitled to . Draft Convention on the International Responsibility of States for Injuries to Aliens (pp. ) Louis B. Sohn and R. R. Baxter DOI: / The United States established a three-mile territorial limit in International law also established the principle that foreign ships are entitled to innocent passage through territorial waters. By the s, however, more than forty countries had asserted a twelve-mile limit for their territorial waters.

Territorial waters are the inland waters, waters between the mean of high tide and low tide, and all water that extend seaward, typically to 12 nautical miles (22 km) from the coast, under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. Territorial waters claimed by . Convention on the international responsibility of states for injuries to aliens; preliminary draft with explanatory notes. Responsibility [prepared by Louis B. Sohn and R. R. Baxter] Imprint [Cambridge] Harvard Law School, Physical description vi, p. Undocumented aliens seeking to reach the United States aboard a transit vessel that has reached the internal waters of the United States at the time of interdiction, but who have not landed or been taken ashore on United States dry land, are not entitled to deportation proceedings (now encompassed within the new "removal proceedings. Responsibility of States. Cambridge, Mass., Harvard Law School, “Draft conventions and comments on nationality, responsibility of States for injuries to aliens, and territorial waters”, Supplement to the American Journal of International Law (Washington, D.C.), vol. 23, special number, April higginS, RosalynFile Size: KB.